Colorado Companies Take a Stand

Companies have a defining role in today’s society – taking a stand. Together, here in Colorado, we can foster a more inclusive society. We can start to dismantle our society’s systems and institutions that reinforce racial biases and systemic racism.

B:CIVIC, alongside, the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce and Prosper Colorado, are supporting companies to deliver on these commitments.

Activate Workforce Solutions and Prosper Colorado will be collaborating in a hiring initiative that reflects the diversity of our community, with details coming soon.

 

Scroll down for resources and actions companies and individuals can take to advance racial justice and equity for all. This page will be continually updated, please check back for additional resources. 

Looking for community-sourced resources include tools and guides to support you and your organizations in your work to drive lasting change?

Interested in joining a conversation and learning best practices?

Please note: This is not a comprehensive list of all the organizations and resources advancing this work and B:CIVIC does not endorse any specific organizations. If you feel an organization is missing, please contact us at info@bcivic.org.

Business Resources

Actions Your Company Can Take:

  • Establish or revise DE&I policies based around your organization’s fundamental values with feedback from employees of color.
  • Create or update hiring practices that focus on organizational goals and supporting diverse candidates.
  • Source diverse vendors for organizational needs. From catering options to company t-shirts, there are opportunities to support local, diverse companies. See recommendations under “Supporting Black-owned Businesses” below.
  • Provide closed-group sessions for Black employees and parents of Black children both with and without leadership on how they are impacted and what the organization can do to support them. If you don’t have an employee resource group, this is a good time to establish one.
  • Educate employees on issues facing Black individuals, bias and increasing empathy. Ensure managers know how to support Black colleagues.
    • Harvard created Project Implicit Bias – it allows you to take a series of tests to see where your unconscious biases lie—looking at race, gender, age, weight, disability and sexuality.
    • CEO’s For Action shares blind spots assessments you and your employees can take.
    • Political Education provides research, analysis and storytelling that help us understand our situation, what we’re up against and what we can do about it.
  • Host a company-wide “How to be an Ally” session. See the practitioner recommendations below.
  • Donate to organizations fighting long-term systemic issues to combat racial inequality. See funds to support below.
  • Hold a giving campaign. Encourage employees to give to racial equity organizations and match dollars when possible.

For additional resources, tools, articles, books and more, access our crowdsourced list featuring recommendations from our 150+ member companies and local community leaders.

Have recommendations? Add them to our list or share them with us at info@bcivic.org.

Assess Your Current Workforce

  • Conduct an assessment of your current workforce demographics.
    • An important first step to initiating change is assessing the current demographics of your workforce. Is the current number of Black employees on your team reflective of national demographics? The local population? Understanding the makeup of your workforce helps to determine what changes you might need to make to ensure your team is demographically representative.
  • Set recruitment targets to address any discrepancies for Black employees.
    • Once you know the makeup of your workforce, identify the specific positions and levels – from frontline workers to the C-suite – where Black employees are underrepresented. From there, set concrete recruitment targets, paired with accountability mechanisms.
  • Conduct an analysis to confirm that you are paying Black employees equally.
    • Today, Black men and women make 72 cents and 62 cents, respectively, for each dollar their white colleagues make. Look at the compensation of your employees, and ask: Are your Black employees paid less? Are they promoted less frequently? Are they receiving smaller raises? Conduct a pay equity analysis that looks at both race/ethnicity and gender across roles, be transparent about the results, and create a plan to correct any discrepancies you find.

 

Examine Practices Around Layoffs and Furloughs

  • Assess whether layoffs or furloughs impact your Black workers disproportionately.
    • Unfortunately, Black workers are disproportionately affected. As you are going through the process of furloughing or laying off your employees, it is imperative that you take a look at whether these actions will impact your Black workers disproportionately. Be aware that bias and/or discrimination could make its way in the layoff process.

 

Recruit Black Workers

  • Develop recruitment strategies that prioritize the inclusion of Black candidates.
    • To include more Black candidates in the hiring process, build recruitment strategies and processes that account for racial and ethnic diversity – like ensuring that at least one ethnically/racially diverse candidate is brought in for final-round interviews and/or establishing resume screening techniques that work to eliminate bias and discrimination.
  • Prioritize local talent, hiring from within, and employment for people with criminal records.
    • In your local community, invest in initiatives that build skills and provide opportunities to your local workforce and community, which can aid in ongoing recruitment efforts for Black candidates. In looking at your existing team, remember that Black workers face greater barriers to advancement. Provide Black employees with additional training, career development opportunities, and managerial support to ensure that they are well-positioned to advance. And finally, it’s imperative to remember that Black Americans are arrested at a far higher rate than any other racial or ethnic group in the U.S. Implement a second-chance policy that helps individuals with criminal records re-enter the workforce, or actively establish a recruitment policy for formerly incarcerated persons.

Learn more on assessing your workforce from JUST Capital.

Diverse Hiring Organizations in Colorado

  • Activate IT: Activate connects overlooked and undervalued talent with employers searching for career-ready employees.
  • CareerWise Colorado: Modern youth apprenticeship program that connects students to opportunities and businesses to talent.
  • CoLabL: Committed to providing opportunity by removing barriers and strengthening connections between employers and diverse, young talent. Students complete project-based learning assignments individually or in teams over the course of 1-2 weeks. Each project incorporates career exploration, skill development and the opportunity to connect with employee volunteers serving as career coaches. Looking for career coaches (mentors) for kids 16+ this summer. Employee volunteers commit to 4 hours over 1-2 weeks.
  • Moonshot Edventures: Moonshot envisions a learner-centered system, led by individuals who share and empathize with the experience of the students and communities they aim to serve, where all children become learners who persist through life and meaningfully contribute to their communities.
  • National Society for Black Engineers: With more than 500 chapters and nearly 16,000 active members in the U.S. and abroad, the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) is one of the largest student-governed organizations. Supporting and promoting the aspirations of collegiate and pre-collegiate students and technical professionals in engineering and technology.
  • National Society for Women in IT: A community that convenes, equips and unites change-leader organizations to increase the influential and meaningful participation of girls and women — at the intersections of race, ethnicity, class, age, sexual orientation and disability status — in the field of computing, particularly in terms of innovation and development.
  • Opportunity Youth: Opportunity youth are young adults between the ages 16 and 24 who are disconnected from school and/or work. Through the Denver Opportunity Youth Initiative (DOYI), nonprofit, government and business organizations are partnering to create a pipeline for opportunity youth that begins with securing support services like housing and affordable child care and extends to education and training opportunities, work experience and eventually job placement.
  • Prosper Colorado: A non-partisan research and communications initiative, led by the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, the Chamber’s Leadership Foundation and the Metro Denver Economic Development Corporation, that is dedicated to identifying and understanding disparities with the goal to make Colorado the very best place in the nation where every single person – no matter race, gender or ethnicity – can truly prosper.
  • Second Chance Center: Offers case management, mentoring and vital resources to assist formerly incarcerated individuals in reestablishing their lives and becoming successful members of the community.
  • Young Aspiring Americans for Social and Political Activism (YAASPA): Endeavors to build the self-efficacy of youth who desire to make change in our communities and pursue social science degrees and social justice careers.

Practitioners to Engage:

Colorado:

TIED (Talent, Inclusion, Engagement and Diversity): A Denver leadership roundtable that consists of company members and practitioners. Companies can join to engage in peer support and roundtables around TIED topics.

 

National:

    Hold a volunteer campaign. Encourage employees to donate their time to volunteer with organizations supporting racial equity and people of color.

    • Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) – Denver: CEO’s program model provides a road map for participants to achieve a long-term goal of remaining attached to the legitimate workforce and maintaining their freedom through returning citizens to employment (post-incarceration). They have volunteer opportunities to support mock interviews/resume writing.
    • Colorado Criminal Justice Reform Coalition: Colorado Criminal Justice Reform Coalition (CCJRC) whose mission is to eliminate the overuse of the criminal justice system and advance community health and safety. Its people convicted of crime, survivors of crime and the families and allies of both. It advocates and organizes for public safety strategies that are more holistic, effective and just.
    • Colorado CURE: CURE is recognized as the leading organization making efforts to reduce crime through criminal justice reform.
    • Colorado Juvenile Defender Center: The Colorado Juvenile Defender Center is dedicated to ensuring excellence in juvenile defense and advocacy and justice for all children and youth in Colorado.
    • Empowerment Program: Holistically helping individuals build healthier lives from the inside out. Trauma-Informed, Gender-Responsive and Holistic Behavioral Health Treatment and Services.
    • My Brother’s Keeper (MBK): Through this national initiative, the City and County of Denver shares the vision of the MBK Alliance, which is to make the American Dream available to all boys and young men of color by eliminating gaps in their opportunities and outcomes.
    • Rocky Mountain Children’s Law Center: Serves Colorado’s abused, neglected and at-risk children. Its team of legal professionals and social workers work as a unit to make sure they consider the whole child in every decision and recommendation.
    • Second Chance Center, Inc. (SCC): Second Chance Center, Inc. (SCC) is determined to be the state’s premier community re-entry program and a model for the nation. SCC offers case management, mentoring and vital resources to assist formerly incarcerated individuals in reestablishing their lives and becoming successful members of the community.
    • The Reentry Initiative: To empower individuals to transition from incarceration to a fulfilling and meaningful life through gender-specific services.
    • VolunteerMatch: A searchable volunteer site where you can select filters for Advocacy & Human Rights, Justice & Legal and Race & Ethnicity.

    Individual Resources

    Actions You Can Take:

    • Become a strong ally. This resource offers insight into what that means in practice, including things to read and watch to open your mind, check your own biases and busy your own ignorance.
    • Use your voice to advocate and amplify the messages and positions you support, talking about the important topics with friends, family and networks.
    • Create space for your personal reflection. If you feel comfortable, help create space for others to reflect.
      • The National Museum of African American History and Culture provides resources you can use to talk about race.
    • Vote for leaders who will help us address systemic issues and change them. Our vote, which is our voice in action, speaks loudly about how we envision the future and reflects the agents for good we expect. As we see in this moment, local elections matter.
    • Buy products and services from Black-owned businesses and companies and professionals taking an active role in building better communities today and for future generations. See the recommendations below.
    • Volunteer in our neighborhoods to make our communities stronger, safer places. Volunteers have made signs and peacefully demonstrated, as well as cleaned broken glass, graffiti and debris left behind from protests.
    • Donate money and things of value to people and organizations that are driving forward on issues we care about. Our financial support serves as fuel to accelerate the change and impact we wish to see. See the recommendations below.
    • Start your own social impact businesses or commit to a year of service with an organization that reflects our values driving solutions forward.
    • Sign petitions and share your voice.

    For additional resources, articles, books and more access our crowdsourced list featuring recommendations from our 150+ member companies and local community leaders.

    Have recommendations? Add them to our list or share them with us at info@bcivic.org.

    Supporting Black-Owned Businesses:

    Buy products and services from companies and professionals taking an active role in building better communities today and for future generations.

    • 303 Magazine created a list of more than 325 Black-owned businesses you can support.
    • Black Business Initiative: Delivers strong business acumen training, mentorship programs, cooperative and traditional pathways to access capital, increased patronage in Black-owned businesses and sound policy that closes the economic chasm known as the “wealth gap.”
    • Bridge to Justice: An impact-oriented social enterprise to bridge the gap between legal needs and legal access with affordable, high-quality legal services.
    • Colorado Black Chamber of Commerce: Serves the needs of African American owned businesses and provides economic opportunity and support to them as well as the communities they serve.
    • Directory of Black-Owned Businesses: By Official Black Wall Street, the largest platform for Black businesses.
    • EforAll: Accelerates economic and social impact in communities nationwide through inclusive entrepreneurship.
    • Equity Solutions based in Boulder started a directory of Black-owned or managed businesses for companies across Colorado.
    • Mountain Plains Minority Supplier Council: Has a diverse network of companies that are minority certified.
    • Rocky Mountain Microfinance Institute: Is a community creating economic and social mobility through entrepreneurship.
    • SistahBiz: Provides a suite of services, resources, and supports for Black women entrepreneurs. These entrepreneurs often have less access to funding from friends and family, and experience barriers to securing loans. When they are able to get financing, it’s often for smaller amounts with higher interest rates.

    Funds to Support

    Donations aren’t enough, but as you work through the long-term process of trying to change a system, it is one of the quickest and most important ways to take action. These can be to local organizations in your communities or national organizations fighting for racial equity.

    Please note: This is not a comprehensive list of all the organizations and resources advancing this work and B:CIVIC does not endorse any specific organizations. If you feel an organization is missing, please contact us at info@bcivic.org.

    Colorado Organizations Advancing Racial Equity:

    • ACLU of Colorado: The ACLU of Colorado is the state’s oldest and largest civil rights organization.
    • Black Business Initiative: Delivers strong business acumen training, mentorship programs, cooperative and traditional pathways to access capital, increased patronage in Black-owned businesses and sound policy that closes the economic chasm known as the “wealth gap.”
    • Black Lives Matter 5280: Working with residents and organizations in Denver, Black Lives Matter 5280 assists in building more loving and united Black communities while eliminating anti-Black violence and racism.
    • Bridge to Justice: An impact-oriented social enterprise to bridge the gap between legal needs and legal access with affordable, high-quality legal services.
    • Building Bridges: Building Bridges equip resilient young leaders to transform divisive attitudes in their communities. Together, they develop personal connections based on empathy and respect and gain the confidence to transform divisive attitudes in their communities.
    • Center for African American Health: The mission of the Center for African-American Health is to improve the health and well-being of the African-American community.
    • Center for Trauma & Resilience: Dedicated to caring for victims of crime through a culturally responsive and trauma-informed approach.
    • Chinook Fund: Directs resources to improve schools, housing, criminal justice reform, living wage jobs, immigrant rights and so many other pressing issues that are improving the lives of Coloradans from all walks of life.
    • Colorado Black Chamber of Commerce: Serves the needs of African American owned businesses and provides economic opportunity and support to them as well as the communities they serve.
    • Colorado Criminal Justice Reform Coalition: Helps people who are impacted by crime and the criminal justice system and to help navigate the criminal justice and health care systems.
    • Colorado Freedom Fund: Founded in 2018, Colorado Freedom Fund is a revolving fund that pays ransom (posts money bond, pays cash bail) for people unable to afford the cost of buying their own freedom.
    • Colorado Juvenile Defender Center: Ensures excellence in juvenile defense and advocacy, and justice for all children and youth in Colorado.
    • Colorado People’s Alliance: Colorado People’s Alliance (COPA) is a racial justice, member-led organization dedicated to advancing and winning progressive social change locally, statewide and nationally.
    • Denver Justice Project: Works with historically marginalized communities to address systemic racism by transforming law enforcement and the structure of the criminal justice system through intersectional movement building, direct action, advocacy and collaborative education.
    • EforAll: Accelerates economic and social impact in communities nationwide through inclusive entrepreneurship.
    • Korey Wise Innocence Project: Receives requests for help from people who believe they have been convicted despite being innocent of any offense, and evaluates these claims to see if there are factual and legal grounds to get back into court with the claims.
    • Latino Leadership Institute: Ensure that leadership of tomorrow is reflective of the growing demographic landscape.
    • Park Hill Collective Impact: Focused on children and families and community-led dialogue and action.
    • Prosper Colorado: Identifies and understands what causes disparity. Armed with information and insights, it will pinpoint strategies to ensure all Coloradans benefit from our economic prosperity. It will then work to make those strategies a reality.
    • Rocky Mountain Children’s Law Center: Advocates for children and youth, drives systemic reform and boldly challenges the status quo so that every young person who has experienced trauma or instability has the opportunity to thrive.
    • Rocky Mountain Microfinance Institute: Is a community creating economic and social mobility through entrepreneurship.
    • Rocky Mountain Peace and Justice Center: Dedicated to radically progressive personal and social change they works to restore and protect Earth and human rights. They educate, organize, act and build community in order to create a culture of justice and peace.
    • Second Chance Center: Provides community re-entry programs for formerly incarcerated individuals including case management, mentoring and support to help clients become successful members of the community.
    • Shop Talk Live: A Black-owned media/communications company that explores issues of racism through original, independent content including videos, podcasts and news. Shop Talk Live is built on community involvement and open forums to promote discussions and healing to repair broken relationships.
    • Showing up for Racial Justice: Organizes white people to do anti-racist advocacy. The Denver and Boulder chapters work to fight white supremacy and help others get involved. The organization is dedicated to providing inclusive resources to Colorado, including this document that outlines the best way to protesting as a white accomplice in Denver.
    • Soul 2 Soul Sisters: A faith-based, Black women-led, racial justice organization focused on healing and liberation.
    • Struggle of Love Denver: Offers alternatives to those with limited opportunities that may not qualify for any other community-based assistance programs.
    • The Bell Policy Center: The Bell Policy Center is igniting a conversation that inspires communities and their leaders to transform Colorado into a state where everyone thrives. We do this by focusing on public policies that advance economic mobility across Colorado.
    • United for a New Economy: UNE is a multiracial community organization building people power and developing leaders in the cities and counties surrounding Denver.
    • Urban Leadership Foundation of Colorado: Has programs and events designed to help individuals become more well-rounded, effective and influential leaders in the areas of business, politics and community service.
    • Uncharted: Uncharted is a social impact accelerator.
    • Whittier Café: Black-owned business that hosts community conversations and actively supports people who raise their voices in support of social justice.
    • Women’s Foundation of Colorado: Catalyzes community to advance and accelerate economic opportunities for Colorado women and their families.
    • Young Aspiring Americans for Social and Political Activism (YAASPA): Endeavors to build the self-efficacy of youth who desire to make change in our communities, pursue social science degrees and social justice careers. 

    Colorado Cultural and Non-Profit Organizations Supporting Black Communities:

    • Black Actors Guild: Believes that every individual holds a unique story and that telling that story can make a real difference.
    • Black American West Museum: Museum honoring African Americans who paved the way in the Western USA.
    • Blair Caldwell African American Research Library: Creates welcoming spaces where all are free to explore and connect.
    • Cleo Parker Robinson Dance: Leverages the universal language of dance to honor African American heritage, explore the human condition and offer a transformative experience through physical movement.
    • Curls on the Block: Enrichment program for girls to embrace, explore and empower their natural selves while working to increase engagement, investment and commitment to careers in science, technology, engineering, art and math (STEAM).
    • Dream Culture: Empowers, enriches and educates families through identifying individual learning styles that compliment achieving success and developing a legacy, thus, eliminating the cycle of miseducation, behavioral misdiagnosis and generational poverty.
    • Read More: Book media and education organization focused on creating an innovative educational curriculum to emphasize personal growth through reading.
    • SistahBiz: Provides a suite of services, resources and supports for Black women entrepreneurs. These entrepreneurs often have less access to funding from friends and family, and experience barriers to securing loans. When they are able to get financing, it’s often for smaller amounts with higher interest rates.
    • Stiles African American Heritage Center: Provides a center emphasizing positive contributions of African Americans while preserving African American history.  
    • The Source Theatre Company: Cultivates an ensemble of indigenous artists to create original theatrical works of cultural and historical significance in the African-American tradition
    • Youth Seen: Services for LGBTQ, QTBIPoC and QTPoC communities around mental health from trained professionals to support groups for parents and youth, case management and training and educations.

    National Organizations Advancing Racial Equity:

    • A list of mutual aid funds.
    • A list of donation sites that accept international payments.
    • ACLU Racial Justice Program: Aims to preserve and extend constitutionally guaranteed rights to people who have historically been denied their rights on the basis of race.
    • Anguish and Action: Founded by President Obama provides a series of programs and support to inspire, empower and connect people to change the world.
    • Black Futures Lab: Transforms Black communities into constituencies that change the way power operates—locally, statewide and nationally. 
    • Black Lives Matter: A global organization in the US, UK and Canada, whose mission is to eradicate white supremacy and build local power to intervene in violence inflicted on Black communities by the state and vigilantes.
    • Black Visions Collective: A Black-led, queer and trans centering organization whose mission is to organize powerful, connected Black communities and dismantle systems of violence…through building strategic campaigns, investing in Black leadership and engaging in cultural and narrative organizing.
    • Black Voters Matter Fund: Works on increasing power in communities through effective voting.
    • Black Youth Project 100: A national organization of Black 18-35-year-olds working towards racial justice through direct-action organizing, advocacy and political education.
    • Brooklyn Bail Fund: Committed to challenging the racism, inequality, and injustice of a criminal legal system and immigration and deportation regime that disproportionately target and harm low-income communities of color.
    • Campaign Zero: Working to end police violence.
    • Center for Policing Equity: Continues to simultaneously aid police departments to realize their own equity goals as well as advance the scientific understanding of issues of equity within organizations and policing.
    • Civil Rights Education and Enforcement Center: CREEC is a membership organization that has the goal of ensuring that everyone can fully and independently participate in our nation’s civic life without discrimination based on race, gender, disability, religion, national origin, sexual orientation or gender identity.
    • Color of Change: The largest online racial justice organization in the country, helping to fight to end the war on Black people in our country.
    • Equal Justice Initiative: Works to provide legal representation to those wrongly convicted or unfairly sentenced.
    • Fund for Black Journalism: Supports small Black newspapers. The voice of the Black press has consistently been the drumbeat for Black America for almost 200 years — from the initial cries to end slavery, to the coverage of Black soldiers in the Civil War.
    • Grassroots Law Project: Focuses on reforming the justice system.
    • Highlander Center: Through popular education, language justice, participatory research, cultural work and intergenerational organizing, they help create spaces — at Highlander and in local communities — where people gain knowledge, hope and courage, expanding their ideas of what is possible.
    • Let Us Breathe Fund: Created in the wake of the murder of Eric Garner. They provide funds to Black and multiracial organizations fighting structural violence and racism in New York City.
    • Movement For Black Lives: Seeks to influence national and local agendas in the direction of our shared vision for Black lives.
    • National Black Food and Justice Alliance: National Black Food and Justice Alliance (NBFJA) is a coalition of Black-led organizations working towards cultivating and advancing Black leadership, building Black self-determination, Black institution building and organizing for food sovereignty, land and justice.
    • National Black Justice Coalition: America’s leading national Black LGBTQ/SGL civil rights organization focused on federal public policy.
    • NAACP Legal Defense Fund: Builds political power and supports communities of color.
    • National Bail Fund Network: Provides emergency rapid response funds across 60+ community bail and bond funds. In addition to providing information about bail funds in each state.
    • National Bail Out: A Black-led and Black-centered collective of abolitionist organizers, lawyers and activists building a community-based movement to support our folks and end systems of pretrial detention and ultimately mass incarceration.
    • National Urban Fund: An advocacy group working to bring economic empowerment, academic opportunities and civil rights to the underserved in America.
    • Northstar Health Collective: Physicians, nurses, healers, herbalists and doulas work in alliance with mainstream and anti-authoritarian organizations to create safe and healthy events.
    • Official George Floyd Memorial Fund—Go Fund Me: Established to cover funeral and burial expenses, mental and grief counseling, lodging and travel for all court proceedings and to assist the family in the days to come as they continue to seek justice for George. A portion of these funds will also go to the Estate of George Floyd for the benefit and care of his children and their educational fund.
    • Project VOYCE: At Project VOYCE, they focus resources and energy on re-imagining democracy and addressing inequity to elevate a new generation of social justice leaders.
    • Reclaim the Block: Organizes Minneapolis community and city council members to move money from the police department into other areas of the city’s budget that truly promote community health and safety.
    • Southern Poverty Law Center: Teaches tolerance, fights hate and seeks justice.
    • The Bail Project: To secure freedom for as many people as possible and fuel momentum for equal justice.
    • The Innocence Project: Exonerates the wrongly convicted through DNA testing and reforms the criminal justice system to prevent future injustice.
    • United Negro College Fund (UNCF): The nation’s largest and most effective minority education organization to help more African American students attend and graduate from college.

    Global Organizations Advancing Racial Justice:

    • Amnesty International: Amnesty International is a global movement of more than 7 million people who take injustice personally. Its campaigning for a world where human rights are enjoyed by all.
    • Grassroots International:
      Grassroots International connects people in the US with global movements solving the root causes of inequality and climate change.
    • Humanity in Action: Together with over 2,150 Fellows and Senior Fellows, who are committed to social justice all around the globe, its an international non-profit, non-partisan and non-governmental organization. Its objective is to facilitate and promote a dialogue to understand and respond to the challenges that democratic societies face as they become increasingly diverse.
    • Human Rights Watch: Human Rights Watch exposes human rights abuses like torture, violence against women and child exploitation.
    • Minority Rights: Minority Rights Group International campaigns worldwide with around 150 partners in over 50 countries to ensure that disadvantaged minorities and indigenous peoples, often the poorest of the poor, can make their voices heard.
    • One Young World: One Young World identifies, promotes and connects the world’s most impactful young leaders to create a better world, with more responsible, more effective leadership.

    Advocating for Change

    Corporations have large influence on today’s society. Changing laws and policies can be hard and require long-term advocacy work. One way to support racial justice is by supporting anti-racism policies.

    Please note: This is not a comprehensive list of all the organizations and resources advancing this work and B:CIVIC does not endorse any specific organizations. If you feel an organization is missing, please contact us at info@bcivic.org.

    Colorado Organizations Advancing Systemic Change:

    • ACLU of Colorado: The ACLU of Colorado is the state’s oldest and largest civil rights organization.
    • Colorado Black Chamber of Commerce: Serves the needs of African American owned businesses and provides economic opportunity and support to them as well as the communities they serve.
    • Colorado Criminal Justice Reform Coalition: Eliminates the overuse of the criminal justice system and advance community health and safety.
    • Colorado Juvenile Defender Center: Ensures excellence in juvenile defense and advocacy, and justice for all children and youth in Colorado.
    • Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce: Guided by the pillars of a strong economy and feedback from members about the biggest challenges they see for our region, the Chamber weighs in on issues that impact our economy and quality of life in the Denver metro area.
    • Denver Justice Project: Works with historically marginalized communities to address systemic racism by transforming law enforcement and the structure of the criminal justice system through intersectional movement building, direct action, advocacy and collaborative education.
    • Good Business Colorado An association that advances the values of its business members by: advocating for local, state and federal policies that reflect its values.
    • Rocky Mountain Children’s Law Center: Advocates for children and youth, drives systemic reform and boldly challenges the status quo so that every young person who has experienced trauma or instability has the opportunity to thrive.
    • Young Aspiring Americans for Social and Political Activism (YAASPA): Endeavors to build the self-efficacy of youth who desire to make change in our communities, pursue social science degrees and social justice careers.

    National Organizations Advancing Systemic Change:

    • #8CANTWAIT: Focuses on reducing killings by police through restrictions of force policies.
    • ACLU Racial Justice Program: Aims to preserve and extend constitutionally guaranteed rights to people who have historically been denied their rights on the basis of race.
    • American Sustainable Business Council: Released a blueprint of policy recommendations for states and localities to address the impacts of COVID-19 while building more resilient economies, based on input from more than 400 business leaders.
    • Ban the Box: A campaign to give those with past convictions a fair chance.
    • Black Futures Lab: Transforms Black communities into constituencies that change the way power operates—locally, statewide and nationally.
    • Campaign Zero: Analyses policing practices across the country, researches to identify effective solutions to end police violence, technical assistance to organizers leading police accountability campaigns and the development of model legislation and advocacy to end police violence nationwide.
    • Center for Policing Equity: Continues to simultaneously aid police departments to realize their own equity goals as well as advance the scientific understanding of issues of equity within organizations and policing.
    • Change.Org: An global platform for signing petitions, on any topic. Most recently trending, Justice for Geroge Floyd petition.
    • Color of Change: A Black-led racial justice organization fighting campaigns for political, corporate and media accountability and change. They have an active petition to end violence against Black people.
    • Mayor’s Pledge: Commit to Action. A call for mayors, city councils and police oversight bodies to address police use of force policies.
    • Movement For Black Lives: Seeks to influence national and local agendas in the direction of our shared vision for Black lives.
    • NAACP: Hosts conversation on the crisis, promotes social movements and take action through its #WeAreDoneDying campaign.
    • National Black Justice Coalition: Provides leadership at the intersection of national civil rights groups and LGBTQ/SGL organizations, advocating for the unique challenges and needs of the African American LGBTQ/SGL community.
    • New Era of Public Safety: Focused on encouraging your mayor and city council to demand their police departments adopt the guidelines below to promote accountability and protect civil rights.
    • PolicyLink: A national research and action institute advancing racial and economic equity by Lifting Up What Works®.

    Questions or have a resource you’d like included?

    Contact us at info@bcivic.org.